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When was the last time you asked a question like a child?

By Navya Sah

Tell me, do you know how a child’s mind functions?  Their incessant questions and ideas are nothing short of wild, imaginative and sometimes downright strange.

Unlike adults, a child’s mind does not function according to a chronological checklist put inside constrained boxes. It is free from the fear of rigid rules.

Children, very nonchalantly, ask questions ranging from “Why does our hair grow?” to “What did it feel like on your last day of being a child?” These questions could appear disconnected but they are layered with depth and perspective.

As a writer, I try to stay conscious of their intelligence and never indulge in baby talk with them. The tone and treatment of my writing may be simple and easy but the complexity of the topic is something that even their adult parents can relate to. A thought is a thought and it can be expressed in very complicated words and plot twists or in a very simple way in a children’s story – but it’s important that the essence of the thought is never lost.

I do not look at children as infants and I do not think one should mollycoddle them. In fact, drawing from personal experiences, as a child I was more open to family members who were not over protective about me and who talked to me as an equal. This is because I did not feel the need to be scared of them or to impress them. I trusted them and I still do.

Trust is hard to build between two people that don’t hold equal power.

I like to write stories that explore emotional relationships. This sort of educational storytelling empowers the child to create their own understandings that are propelled by questions and emotional introspection. In simple terms, a child becomes what she/he reads, thinks, eats, wears, dreams, speaks, whispers and most importantly feels.

If you make him/her feel like a responsible and valued human being, he/she will become one.

So, the next time your child asks you a delicate murmured question like “ I wonder what love looks like” on one of your down days, you know where to bring them!

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When was the last time you asked a question like a child?

By Navya

Tell me, do you know how a child’s mind functions?  Their incessant questions and ideas are nothing short of wild, imaginative and sometimes downright strange.

Unlike adults, a child’s mind does not function according to a chronological checklist put inside constrained boxes. It is free from the fear of rigid rules.

Children, very nonchalantly, ask questions ranging from “Why does our hair grow?” to “What did it feel like on your last day of being a child?” These questions could appear disconnected but they are layered with depth and perspective.

As a writer, I try to stay conscious of their intelligence and never indulge in baby talk with them. The tone and treatment of my writing may be simple and easy but the complexity of the topic is something that even their adult parents can relate to. A thought is a thought and it can be expressed in very complicated words and plot twists or in a very simple way in a children’s story – but it’s important that the essence of the thought is never lost.

I do not look at children as infants and I do not think one should mollycoddle them. In fact, drawing from personal experiences, as a child I was more open to family members who were not over protective about me and who talked to me as an equal. This is because I did not feel the need to be scared of them or to impress them. I trusted them and I still do.

Trust is hard to build between two people that don’t hold equal power.

I like to write stories that explore emotional relationships. This sort of educational storytelling empowers the child to create their own understandings that are propelled by questions and emotional introspection. In simple terms, a child becomes what she/he reads, thinks, eats, wears, dreams, speaks, whispers and most importantly feels.

If you make him/her feel like a responsible and valued human being, he/she will become one.

So, the next time your child asks you a delicate murmured question like “ I wonder what love looks like” on one of your down days, you know where to bring them!

Get Kutuki

Connect with Us