Kutuki Blog Header

Let Your Children Daydream

By Navya Sah

I think children are phenomenal. They are my inspiration and they make me believe in a better world. And I love it when they build their own worlds inside their heads.

I too have always been a lost-sort-of-girl weaving my own fantasies and living in a world of “daydreaming”. I space out so very often that it is distinctly visible on my face and my friends have to snap me out of this recurring blank stare into nothingness. My argument here is that what if I am not spacing out into nothingness, but into a subconscious world, which I am always building inside my head.

I feel daydreaming into the surreal worlds is what keeps my energy going. I do lots of strange things like bathe with the lights off, collect sand from different cities and also write aphorisms on my walls (phrases that I pick up from music or movies). I feel these fantasies are what have empowered my mundane reality.

As a writer for children’s stories I always want to keep in mind the imagination of a child and push it. I actually want to push it over a hill and let it fly up into a world full of mythical creatures in strange lands and untouched emotions. If you really look keenly, our reality too is filled with many wondrous things that want us to think! Look at your own body. Isn’t it a marvellous piece of creation? And there are many such creatures that one can find in forests, seas and even in our bathrooms and dreams , if one allows themselves to really look!

However, it is also important to be able to mix reality and imagination to provide a good lesson. Through fantasy, a child can understand very real and concrete topics like numbers, colours, shapes and even complex mechanisms like how vision works! I know for a fact that children listen more to Alice in Wonderland which is a fantastical story rather than a straightforward lesson in their classroom!

I tried using this element of fantasy to teach counting in a story called “Fourzeeyumpyjump.” This is a short story aimed at 3-5 year olds, teaching them to recognise the number 4 and how to count up to 4. You have to watch the video to see the fun things which happen in it! But what I can tell you is that it features a fantasy creature shaped like the number 4 trying to teach children to count by making them actively participate in the story through wonder and movement.

Fantasy is not flimsy or all woodledeedeedoo. It is educational. I remember, as a child I read so much fantasy fiction by J.K. Rowling or Lewis Carol (you have to read about how he named himself. Yes you can name yourself!) and then I grew up to read the life-changing 1984 by Orwell. All these stories which were set in reality and imagination completely transformed the way I look at the world and made me much more respectful of different emotions too. I wish to create more magical stories grounded in reality that provide an educational lesson.

And so, if you allow your children to daydream more often, you will see that they can build many such strange stories that will stretch the worlds’ imaginations along many unknown, undiscovered and trespass-able lands. Who knows your child might be able to figure out how to replenish the world’s water tables through one simple idea in their dream!

After all, invention is nothing but a creative accident.

Get Kutuki

Connect with Us

Let Your Children Daydream

By Navya

I think children are phenomenal. They are my inspiration and they make me believe in a better world. And I love it when they build their own worlds inside their heads.

I too have always been a lost-sort-of-girl weaving my own fantasies and living in a world of “daydreaming”. I space out so very often that it is distinctly visible on my face and my friends have to snap me out of this recurring blank stare into nothingness. My argument here is that what if I am not spacing out into nothingness, but into a subconscious world, which I am always building inside my head.

I feel daydreaming into the surreal worlds is what keeps my energy going. I do lots of strange things like bathe with the lights off, collect sand from different cities and also write aphorisms on my walls (phrases that I pick up from music or movies). I feel these fantasies are what have empowered my mundane reality.

Fantasy is not flimsy or all woodledeedeedoo. It is educational. I remember, as a child I read so much fantasy fiction by J.K. Rowling or Lewis Carol (you have to read about how he named himself. Yes you can name yourself!) and then I grew up to read the life-changing 1984 by Orwell. All these stories which were set in reality and imagination completely transformed the way I look at the world and made me much more respectful of different emotions too. I wish to create more magical stories grounded in reality that provide an educational lesson.

And so, if you allow your children to daydream more often, you will see that they can build many such strange stories that will stretch the worlds’ imaginations along many unknown, undiscovered and trespass-able lands. Who knows your child might be able to figure out how to replenish the world’s water tables through one simple idea in their dream!

After all, invention is nothing but a creative accident.

As a writer for children’s stories I always want to keep in mind the imagination of a child and push it. I actually want to push it over a hill and let it fly up into a world full of mythical creatures in strange lands and untouched emotions. If you really look keenly, our reality too is filled with many wondrous things that want us to think! Look at your own body. Isn’t it a marvellous piece of creation? And there are many such creatures that one can find in forests, seas and even in our bathrooms and dreams , if one allows themselves to really look!

However, it is also important to be able to mix reality and imagination to provide a good lesson. Through fantasy, a child can understand very real and concrete topics like numbers, colours, shapes and even complex mechanisms like how vision works! I know for a fact that children listen more to Alice in Wonderland which is a fantastical story rather than a straightforward lesson in their classroom!

I tried using this element of fantasy to teach counting in a story called “Fourzeeyumpyjump.” This is a short story aimed at 3-5 year olds, teaching them to recognise the number 4 and how to count up to 4. You have to watch the video to see the fun things which happen in it! But what I can tell you is that it features a fantasy creature shaped like the number 4 trying to teach children to count by making them actively participate in the story through wonder and movement.

Get Kutuki

Connect with Us